Foliage Gallery
Decorative Foliage

Foliage Articles & Resources
Fall Trees - Spring, Summer, Fall Foliage of Japanese Maples
Japanese maple trees bear fine fall foliage. But compared to most trees, even the spring and summer foliage of Japanese maples is like "fall foliage." In addition, some cultivars have a weeping habit, while many have an appealing lacy leaf-type. This introduction briefly describes "Bloodgood," "Crimson Queen," "Filigree" and red Japanese maple trees.
Quintessential Fall Trees - Maple Trees
If I were putting together a dictionary, the entry for "autumn" would have next to it a picture of maple trees, adorned in their fall foliage colors of red, yellow and orange. Among the native trees of eastern North America, it is certainly the maple trees that bring out the most leaf-peepers, to gaze at their spectacular fall foliage.
Fall Trees - Oak Trees for Late-Season Fall Foliage
The fall foliage of oak trees is not as spectacular as that of the maples. But oak leaves turn later in the autumn than do maple leaves (November in the northeastern U.S.), allowing you to extend the fall foliage season. Learn about red oak trees, white oak trees and pin oak trees.
Sumac: Rich in Fall Foliage, Culinary History and More
Poison sumac is only one variety of sumac, and it is easily distinguished from the non-poisonous varieties. The latter should be considered as potential landscaping shrubs, since they provide splendid fall foliage and are easy to grow. In addition, sumac has been used for culinary purposes, for erosion control, and as a wind break. It also attracts birds.
Planting Trees for Fall Color
A Virginia Tech Extension feature on October landscaping considerations, including some sound advice on selecting the proper trees for fall color displays. Considering how long it takes trees to mature, this is one area where proper planning is essential! You want to know right now what colors a tree will produce, not years down the road, after much expenditure of cash and energy….
Fall Trees - White Ash, American Mountain Ash Trees
Learn about two types of ash trees grown for their fall foliage: American mountain ash trees and white ash trees. In addition to fall foliage, the American mountain ash trees exhibit interesting spring flowers and summer berries. While you're exploring fall foliage ideas for your landscape, also discover the unique place of the ash tree in Viking lore.
Fall Trees - Quaking Aspen Trees
The fall foliage of quaking aspen trees is almost synonymous with fall in the American West. The proclivity of its foliage to tremble in the breeze is as famous as the golden-yellow of its autumn leaves. Find out where -- and where not -- to grow this fall foliage standout.
Fall Trees - Fall Foliage, 4-Season Interest of Beech Trees
Learn about 3 types of beech trees grown for their foliage. American beech trees and European beech trees are fall foliage standouts that also provide winter interest. Meanwhile, Tricolor beech trees has colorful variegated foliage that will be prominent in your landscaping spring, summer and fall.
Fall Trees - Autumn Leaves of Birch Trees
Birch trees provide more than just colorful autumn leaves. Their bark is as interesting as their foliage, with its characteristic shedding pattern. The classic (paper) birch has bark with a white color, but other colors are available (e.g., yellow). Other birch trees have a weeping form. All of these fine fall foliage trees display yellow leaves in autumn.
Fall Trees - Dogwood Trees for Foliage, Flowers
When we think of dogwood trees, we immediate think, "flowering." And indeed, dogwood trees put on an impressive display in spring with their flowering. But dogwoods also bear attractive autumn leaves. Two dogwood trees are described here, each offering different fall foliage colors.

Colorful Foliage Plants - Description: Learn how to use your various tropical plants to add an interesting to...

Filling the Gaps in the Garden
Description: Think of your garden beds as if they were giant vases - and you are ab...

Foliage - The Living Palette - Part 1
Description: Plant foliage creates the form and texture of the garden. True, many ...

Foliage -- The Living Palette Part 2
Description: As I write, an icy rain beats relentlessly on my sleeping USDA zone 7 ...

Foliage all around me: And Not a Drop of Green
Description: You can have color all year even when nothing is in bloom....

Foliage To The Rescue! Part 2
Description: Foliage for sunny, shady and wet places....

Foliage To The Rescue! Using Leafy Plants To Fill and Frame.
Description: Foliage that can help us in our garden....

Foliage: The Living Palette - Part 4
Description: Today, I'd like to explore other ways to use foliage contrasts and ech...

Gardens of Silver
Description: Silver foliage plants can be garden work horses, keeping warring color...

Pleasing Plantings - One Leaf at A Time.
Description: A garden that looks good all year starts with the foliage color, textu...

The flowerless garden: Foliage can be beautiful
Description: You can create a gorgeous garden with only foliage - and never miss th...

Leaves - Shape Part 3
Leaves are the engines of life on this planet; their shapes, flat or round, smooth or rough, thick or feathery in infinite variation, create the form of our plants to our delight or despair. The answer to why there is such variation lies in the past, in the present and inside the leaves themselves.

Wild, Wonderful Aroids
Aroids! I've loved some for years, but have recently discovered more and passion is taking over. This diverse family, Araceae, which contains over three thousand species in about a hundred genera of mostly tropical and sub-tropical new-world plants, ranges from aquatics to vines. It is probably already represented in your house or garden - and you might not even know it!

Variegation on the Green Theme - Part One
There's nothing wrong with green. Green, from spring's acid awakening to late summer's dusky hue, is the color of life on this planet. But, green, like life, can use a little spice. Variegated foliage is spice for the shady garden, where flowers are few in mid-summer.

Wild, Wonderful Aroids - Part 5 - Pinellia
Compared to their close cousins, Arisaema, the genus Pinellia "don't get no respect". This is unfair. While most of them aren't as exotic as many Arisaema, they add their own charm to the shady garden.

Wild, Wonderful Aroids: Part 4 - Arisaema
A gardener's love affair with a plant, or genus of plants, is very like that between humans. A first glance can be love at first sight, or a mild interest grows into admiration then fascination; obsession, culminating in long-lasting true love. My relationship with the genus Arisaema has followed the latter course.

Wild, Wonderful Aroids - Part 4, Arisaema - Page 2
Arisaema - Page 2 Arisaema triphyllum and A.sikokianum


Wild, Wonderful Aroids - Part 4, Arisaema - Page 3
Arisaema, Page 3 Arisaema candidissimum, A. fargesii and A. ringens


Wild, Wonderful Aroids-Part 3-Amorphophallus
Hark all squeamish prudes! This genus is not for you. It is, however, for all with an eye for detail who love extraordinary plants.


Wild, Wonderful Aroids-Part 3-Amorphophallus-Page 2
Page 2 - Amorphophallus - The Big Stink, Intimate Views, Pollinators, Fruit and The Obsession Grows (Amorphophallus paeoniifolius)


Wild, Wonderful Aroids-Part 3-Amorphophallus-Page 3
Page 3 - Amorphophallus - Amorphophallus bulbifer, Cultivation, Sneak preview images from Plant Delights, So, which species do I have a chance of growing in my garden? and More Information on the Web.


Wild, Wonderful Aroids Part Two - Elephant Ears, Alocasia, Colocasia and Xanthosoma
While caladiums are sometimes called 'elephant ears', to me the real elephant ears are the huge plants that belong to three genera: Alocasia, Colocasia and Xanthosoma These are fantastic plants for those wanting a tropical "look"...and for those of us who crave variegated foliage. Please be patient while the page loads for you!

Leaves - Shape Part 2
When you stop to think about it, the variety in leaf shapes in the plant kingdom is rather astonishing. Why are there so many different leaf shapes in the first place? And, why do the leaves vary in shape on single species? The answers to these questions are both simple and extremely complex.

Leaves - Shape Part 1
When autumn's high color is past, leaves rain down upon my garden, signaling weeks of raking and vacuuming to remove them from drive, paths and evergreen perennials. Shoveling leaves into a leaf vac by hand offers ample opportunity for close examination. It's also not exactly taxing mentally; the mind tends to wander. Mine started wandering down the path of wondering just why leaves take different shapes.

Vines Part 6 - More Ivy Plus
Ivy is an remarkably variable plant. Leaf size, shape and coloration differ tremendously among cultivars, most of which have been found as mutations rather than having been bred on purpose. Not only do cultivars vary, individual plants, depending on their level of maturity, can have leaves that bear almost no resemblance to others growing a few inches away. There are also other vines I grow or want to grow plus a lot of photos and images in this article, so please be patient while it loads.

Vines - Part 5 - Ivy
A lot of plants are called "ivy", but only those belonging to the genus Hedera are really ivy. Most of us know ivy as a rather rampant and somewhat boring evergreen ground or building cover, but once you discover the shapes, forms and colors of ivy, be warned, it can become addictive. As a vine for shade, it is unsurpassed. I have lots of photos for you, so the page may be slow to load.

Vines - Part 4
I grow several vines on purpose and a few unwelcome ones bestowed by Mother Nature. One species starts out very shrub-like, another twines, some are annuals. Some thrive and bloom in shade and some will grow but not flower. There are also vines in my past and some that I hope will be in my future. My garden would be incomplete without the soft high notes of vines.

Vines - Part 3 - Clematis
Vines are amazing plants. With their ability to either climb vertically or spread horizontally, they enable us to create many-layered interest in our gardens. If you've avoided using vines because you think they can get out of hand and become weedy pests, think again. While this is true of some, it's also true of many garden-worthy plants that none of us would be without. With some exceptions, weediness is not a characteristic of Clematis, the Queen of the twining vines.

Vines - Part 2
Vines come in all sorts of types, sizes and vigor. There are annual vines that you plant each year from seed and woody vines, some of whom make a statement all year around. Some vines have Attila The Hun tendencies and will take over the world (or at least your patch of it) if not watched and some require no end of coaxing to keep alive and flourishing. Some vines do very well in shade; some require sun to thrive and some will grow in shade, but not flower well. The variety is almost endless; here are a few more that you may know and grow or that may tempt you.

Vines - Part 1
Curling, twining, clinging or snaking along the ground, vines of one kind or another play a big part in my garden. Vines provide shade; they also grow in various degrees of shade. Vines are especially valuable for gardens where space is tight, since they occupy little ground when grown vertically. Vines vary from annuals, planted from seed each year to woody plants providing interesting structure the year around.

Hot, Hot, Hot Garden
Is it hot enough for you, yet? It certainly is for me! Like my plants, I droop when the temperatures soar. Gardening tasks are done in slow motion, if done at all...plenty of time to contemplate the weather and its effect on plants and the gardener.

Heuchera - Fantastical Foliage
In the last few years, we foliage nuts with shady gardens have been blessed by plant breeders, such as Dan Heims of Terra Nova Nurseries, who have given us the marvelous new foliage Heuchera to play with. I've started a modest collection to share with you, and lust for more. There are lots of images, so please be patient while the page loads for you.

Hardy Euphorbias - Part 2
There's a hardy Euphorbia for just about every garden and every garden situation, from dry and sunny with sharp drainage to cool, shady places. There's even at least one that prefers damp soil. They range from short, sprawling plants to shrub substitutes reaching several feet tall and wide. Many are evergreen, lighting up the garden even in winter. There are lots of photos, so please be patient while the page loads for you.

Hardy Euphorbias - Part 1
Hardy Euphorbia are one of my loves in the plant world. The foliage, form and flowers are all soul satisfying. As Dan Hinkley of Heronswood Nursery said, "you can't have too many euphorbs". In this two part series, I'll tell you about the ones that I grow, have grown and some I want to grow. Plus, I'll tell you which nurseries online list which plants. There are a lot of photos, so please be patient while the page loads for you...

Late Color - Part 3
Subtle variations in tone and tint add a richness to the sepia of our November gardens and conclude this series on Late Color.

Late Color - Part 2
Last week, I shared some late color from my USDA zone 7 garden in the green and yellow range; this week, we'll blaze out! Get out your sunglasses and enjoy the color. Warning! Lots of images - may load slowly for you.

Late Color
As November wends it's way into December, bleak becomes the adjective to describe the landscape for gardeners in the northern hemisphere. This week, I have some eyecandy to stave off color starvation for winter frustrated gardeners. Warning - this one is photo intensive and may be slow to load for you.

Foliage: The Living Palette - Part 4
Today, I'd like to explore other ways to use foliage contrasts and echoes in the garden.

Foliage: The Living Palette - Part 3
As we dream of our gardens and what we want to do, we need to keep our aesthetic tools in mind. Foliage is one of the primary tools available to those of us who garden in shade. With it, we can weave a living tapestry. I've finally gotten a scanner and I've been playing with it. One of these days, I'll figure out the best way to use it. In the meantime, please bear with me if my page is slow to load.

Foliage -- The Living Palette Part 2
As I write, an icy rain beats relentlessly on my sleeping USDA zone 7 garden. This makes it doubly pleasurable to turn my mind to the many nuances of foliage. Let's explore more facets of our living palette.

Foliage - The Living Palette - Part 1
Plant foliage creates the form and texture of the garden. True, many plants also have stems and branches that contribute mightily to form and texture, but during the growing season, foliage is King.

Perennial Foliage For Early Winter
The tree and shrub leaves have drifted over my borders and most perennials in my garden have retreated underground, or into tight rosettes, for the winter. Nevertheless, a jaunt around the garden found several perennials whose leaves are still very much in evidence; aiding the evergreen trees and shrubs in furnishing the early winter garden.

Arum italicum 'Pictum'
When the weather is chilly, wet and dreary and leaves are covering the ground instead of tree branches, fresh foliage is hard to find. Arum italicum is just starting to hit it's stride.

Putting the Garden to Bed for Winter
If the shade in your garden is provided by large trees, then dealing with leaves is, no doubt, high on your list of "things to do" in putting your garden to bed for the winter.

Harbingers of Fall - Part VII - Tricyrtis
Toad lilies are a must for shady gardens from USDA zones 5 south.

Harbingers of Fall Part VI: Cimicifuga
If there is such a creature as a "perfect plant", I think Cimicifuga simplex var simplex (originally sold to me with the invalid name of (C. ramosa 'Atropurpurea') is the one.

Harbingers of Fall - Part V - Asters, Part 3
Right now, my garden is frothing with white flowers from the species asters that I grow. I only grow very few of the many that are really worthy of space in the garden. Here are a few more to add to the list of 'must haves'.

Harbingers of Fall - Part IV - Asters, Part 2
There are many aster species and cultivars that can provide color in your garden.

Harbingers of Fall - Part III - Asters, Part 1, Etc.
Just coming on now, Asters are plants that really wrap up the gardening season in my USDA zone 7 garden.

Harbingers of Fall - Part II - Liriope
There are a few more plants whose blooming tells me that the gardening season is winding down. After Eupatorium, the first to nudge me is Liriope.

Harbingers of Fall - Part I - Eupatorium
I don't know about you, but I tend to garden merrily along, somehow feeling that the gardening season will just go on and on until, one day, I look up and certain plants have come into bloom that always warn me that time is getting short. Fall is just around the corner. Eupatorium - Joe Pye Weed - is one of them.

Flowers, Fruits and Foliage of Faith, Part 1

Welcome to Chiangmai and Chiangrai Magazine article Flowers, Fruits and Foliage of Faith (Part 1).
welcome-to.chiangmai-chiangrai.com/foliage_faith.htm

"Hill Gardens of Maine - Softer - More Natural - Dry Flowers & Foliage"

Hill Gardens of Maine. An Article by author/nurseryman Fred Davis about using glycerin to insure softer, more natural feeling foliage in dry flower arrangements, plus an extensive archive of ... To view other previous articles, click Archives) ... glow". Particularly useful for ordinarily tough, woody foliage like eucalyptus, beech, boxwood and vining ivy, glycerin ...


Foliage of Fall Trees

Fall Trees - White Ash, American Mountain Ash TreesLearn about two types of ash trees grown for their fall foliage: American mountain ash trees and white ash trees. In addition to fall foliage, the American mountain ash trees exhibit interesting spring flowers and summer berries. While you're exploring fall foliage ideas for your landscape, also discover the unique place of the ash tree in Viking lore.

Fall Trees - Quaking Aspen TreesThe fall foliage of quaking aspen trees is almost synonymous with fall in the American West. The proclivity of its foliage to tremble in the breeze is as famous as the golden-yellow of its autumn leaves. Find out where -- and where not -- to grow this fall foliage standout.

Fall Trees - Fall Foliage, 4-Season Interest of Beech TreesLearn about 3 types of beech trees grown for their foliage. American beech trees and European beech trees are fall foliage standouts that also provide winter interest. Meanwhile, Tricolor beech trees has colorful variegated foliage that will be prominent in your landscaping spring, summer and fall.

Fall Trees - Autumn Leaves of Birch TreesBirch trees provide more than just colorful autumn leaves. Their bark is as interesting as their foliage, with its characteristic shedding pattern. The classic (paper) birch has bark with a white color, but other colors are available (e.g., yellow). Other birch trees have a weeping form. All of these fine fall foliage trees display yellow leaves in autumn.

Fall Trees - Dogwood Trees for Foliage, FlowersWhen we think of dogwood trees, we immediate think, "flowering." And indeed, dogwood trees put on an impressive display in spring with their flowering. But dogwoods also bear attractive autumn leaves. Two dogwood trees are described here, each offering different fall foliage colors.

Fall Trees - Spring, Summer, Fall Foliage of Japanese MaplesJapanese maple trees bear fine fall foliage. But compared to most trees, even the spring and summer foliage of Japanese maples is like "fall foliage." In addition, some cultivars have a weeping habit, while many have an appealing lacy leaf-type. This introduction briefly describes "Bloodgood," "Crimson Queen," "Filigree" and red Japanese maple trees.

Quintessential Fall Trees - Maple TreesIf I were putting together a dictionary, the entry for "autumn" would have next to it a picture of maple trees, adorned in their fall foliage colors of red, yellow and orange. Among the native trees of eastern North America, it is certainly the maple trees that bring out the most leaf-peepers, to gaze at their spectacular fall foliage.

Fall Trees - Oak Trees for Late-Season Fall FoliageThe fall foliage of oak trees is not as spectacular as that of the maples. But oak leaves turn later in the autumn than do maple leaves (November in the northeastern U.S.), allowing you to extend the fall foliage season. Learn about red oak trees, white oak trees and pin oak trees.

Sumac: Rich in Fall Foliage, Culinary History and MorePoison sumac is only one variety of sumac, and it is easily distinguished from the non-poisonous varieties. The latter should be considered as potential landscaping shrubs, since they provide splendid fall foliage and are easy to grow. In addition, sumac has been used for culinary purposes, for erosion control, and as a wind break. It also attracts birds.

Planting Trees for Fall ColorA Virginia Tech Extension feature on October landscaping considerations, including some sound advice on selecting the proper trees for fall color displays. Considering how long it takes trees to mature, this is one area where proper planning is essential! You want to know right now what colors a tree will produce, not years down the road, after much expenditure of cash and energy….

Ironwood - Trees with Colorful Fall Foliage - Trees with colorful fall foliage beginning with the letter I

Velvet sumac - Trees with Colorful Fall Foliage - Trees with colorful fall foliage beginning with the letter V

Salix elaeagnos through sycamore - Trees with Colorful Fall Foliage - Trees with colorful fall foliage beginning with the letter S

Hamamelis through Hornbeam- Trees with Colorful Fall Foliage - Trees with colorful fall foliage beginning with the letter H

Eastern Redbud - Trees with Colorful Fall Foliage - Trees with colorful fall foliage beginning with the letter E

Acer palmatum to American Mountain Ash- Trees with Colorful Fall Foliage - Trees with colorful fall foliage beginning with the letter A

Betula alleghaniensis (B. lutea) through Butternut- Trees with Colorful Fall Foliage - Trees with colorful fall foliage beginning with the letter B

Tilia cordata through tupelo - Trees with Colorful Fall Foliage - Trees with colorful fall foliage beginning with the letter T

Red maple through rosemary willow- Trees with Colorful Fall Foliage - Trees with colorful fall foliage beginning with the letter R

Quaking aspen through Quercus rubra- Trees with Colorful Fall Foliage - Trees with colorful fall foliage beginning with the letter Q

Maidenhair tree through Musclewood - Trees with Colorful Fall Foliage - Trees with colorful fall foliage beginning with the letter M

Korean mountain ash - Trees with Colorful Fall Foliage - Trees with colorful fall foliage beginning with the letter K

Diospyros virginiana to Dogwood - Trees with Colorful Fall Foliage - Trees with colorful fall foliage beginning with the letter D

Carpinus caroliniana to Cornus florida - Trees with Colorful Fall Foliage - Trees with colorful fall foliage beginning with the letter C

Persimmon through Pyrus calleryana 'Bradford'- Trees with Colorful Fall Foliage - Trees with colorful fall foliage beginning with the letter P

Oriental cherry through Oxydendrum arboreum - Trees with Colorful Fall Foliage - Trees with colorful fall foliage beginning with the letter O

Nemopanthus (olearia ilicifolia) through Nyssa sylvatica - Trees with Colorful Fall Foliage - Trees with colorful fall foliage beginning with the letter N

Large-toothed aspen through Littleleaf linden - Trees with Colorful Fall Foliage - Trees with colorful fall foliage beginning with the letter L

Japanese flowering cherry through Juneberry - Trees with Colorful Fall Foliage - Trees with colorful fall foliage beginning with the letter J

Ginkgo biloba through Gleditsia triacanthos - Trees with Colorful Fall Foliage - Trees with colorful fall foliage beginning with the letter G

Fagus grandifolia through Flowering Dogwood - Trees with Colorful Fall Foliage - Trees with colorful fall foliage beginning with the letter F

Yellow birch through yellow poplar - Trees with Colorful Fall Foliage - Trees with colorful fall foliage beginning with the letter Y

White ash through Witch hazel - Trees with Colorful Fall Foliage - Trees with colorful fall foliage beginning with the letter W